Myson Hydronic Radiator Office Installation Example

Here at Houseneeds we walk the walk. When we decided to expand our office, we where lacking heat in the new space. Not a problem with a warehouse full of heating supplies. Myson European panel radiators where chosen as the best way to warm the space. We tied into the buildings heating system with Al-PEX Tubing, PEX manifold then transitioning to HousePEX Pex A Tubing and finally to the Myson radiators

Why are European panel radiators different?

European panel radiators send heat out horizontally, radiating 85% out in approximately a 15 foot semi-circular pattern. They send only 15% heat up the wall as convection. This is the opposite of fin tube baseboard. Panel radiators respond quickly when heat is called for. This compliments radiant heat, when an unused area, such as a guest room, needs heat quickly. Many homes place radiant in the basement or first floor living space and then use radiators in bedrooms or mudrooms, where quick heat is needed.

Easily add into your existing baseboard system!

Panel radiators also run at the same temps as hydronic baseboard. This means you can add one radiator at a time, tying into your existing system, via Mono-Flo Tee's. This special tee partially diverts water from a series run, saving high temperature water for the remaining radiators.

Panel radiators do not cost a lot! Starting at around $60 plus shipping, Myson radiators are a great alternative to baseboard and compliment any radiant design, where quick heat is needed.

1. Selecting radiator locations

There are many factors when choosing a place for a radiator: Where you will sit in the room, doors, windows and access to supply lines. There's always a balancing act. A cardboard mock-up helps visualize this.

Selecting radiator location to install Myson Hydronic Radiators

2. Tying into the heating system

Here is a shot from above the office space. An unused hydronic fan convector was selected as the tie in spot. With a few wiring changes, the circulator that used to service the fan convector, now brings hot water to the radiators. A manifold was mounted on a backer board. The PEX was then run to the individual locations for each radiator.

Tying in a radiator to the general Heating System

Tying in a radiator to the general Heating System

3. Running the PEX

We used surplus HousePEX that was left over, from when the PEX was clear. All of our current HousePEX is Red or Clear and heating certified by the ASTM.

Lines where chased down and fastened with plastic bend supports and talon clamps. We plumbed the radiators in 3/8", supply and return lines, services by a PEX tubing Manifold, equipped with balancing valves and flow meters, allowing individual flow control.

Running the PEX tubing to the Hydronic Radiators System

Running the PEX tubing to the Hydronic Radiators System

Running the PEX tubing to the Hydronic Radiators System

4. Attaching the mounting brackets

Myson has 2 types of brackets with the sale of each radiator. There is a detailed Myson manua1 to guide you. We used the concrete brackets and a plywood backer board, as the existing framing was not adequate for mounting. Reflective insulation behind the radiators is a good idea, if you are opening up your walls at the same time. The backer board can be as small as the foot print and is optional. Most installations attach directly to the wall.

Attaching the mounting brackets to the Hydronic Radiators System

Attaching the mounting brackets to the Hydronic Radiators System

5. Stubbing the supply and return lines

The PEX was run to the selected location and brought out at baseboard height.

Stubbing the supply and return lines to the Hydronic Radiators System

6. Attaching copper to PEX & Mounting the baseboard

Sioux Chief Copper Stub-Out Elbow - XLE23S0 were used. This provides a 3/8" PEX barb to crimp to and 1/2" copper to compress the valves to. The built in 90° elbow makes the needed bend and rolled closed end allows for easy pressure testing. We feel this is one of the best ways to go, if you will be leaving this in the wall. An easy to use Crimp toolattaches the PEX, making a permanent connection.

Once the PEX was attached to the copper, we attached the baseboard (lower right). We did not use escutcheons for this project, hence the tight fit through the baseboard. When an escutcheon is used a hole, just smaller than the cover plate can be made, making valve attachment easier. The stub outs were cut and cleaned for the valves.

Attaching copper to PEX and Mounting the baseboard to the Hydronic Radiators System

Attaching copper to PEX and Mounting the baseboard to the Hydronic Radiators System

Attaching copper to PEX and Mounting the baseboard to the Hydronic Radiators System

Attaching copper to PEX and Mounting the baseboard to the Hydronic Radiators System

7. Installing the Myson valves

The manufacturer provides clear instructions and special glue for the valves. They compress onto the copper with a wrench.

Installing the Myson valves to the Hydronic Radiators System

8. Hanging the radiator

Ideally two people can walk the radiator onto the brackets, hanging the top first and then sliding it onto the bottom hook. Here is a close-up of the panel in place.

Hanging the Myson Hydronic Radiators System

9. The finished product

Here is the panel in the new space. All of the radiators are tied into one thermostat. We placed the thermostat in the middle of the room. A TRV valve, supplied by Myson as an accessory, separately controls each radiator. The TRV Valve has a temperature setting. This allows an entire floor of a house to be set up as one zone, with individual room control.

The Installed Myson Hydronic Radiators System

10. Myson’s TRV Thermostatic radiator valve close-up and LKD16AN Valve close-up

The Installed Myson Hydronic Radiators System with TRV Valve

The Installed Myson Hydronic Radiators System with TRV Valve